The economy is moving fast, and change is happening at a rapid pace. If you want to succeed, you have to be ready to move when opportunity arises, and ready to change lanes when challenges arise.  Stand still and you will be left in the dust. Your best hope of succeeding in this economy is a strong team,  ready for action, motivated by change and willing to go for broke.

To build a team like that you have to be ready and willing to embrace turnover. You need to understand and accept that not everyone shares your vision, your passion for growth and your adaptability for change. And to be okay with that.

I don’t know why it is, but we have been taught in life that holding on to people (friends, peers, employees) at all costs is not only a good thing, it is the right thing. We measure the depth of a man’s character by the length of his friendships, the loyalty of a man by his history with his peers , and the strength of a company by the seniority of its employees.

Now I am not saying that is a bad thing, I am just questioning if that is the best measurement for business growth and development. I believe that in a shifting market and a fast-paced economy, turnover is not only a natural thing,  it can be a good thing. As business owners, we know that to stay ahead of our competition, to keep providing our clients with an exceptional experience, we need to keep pushing the envelope. What passed for good last year won’t even meet the bar this year. Raise the bar, and accept that not everyone on your team is willing to meet the challenge.

Every year you need to allow people to decide if they want to stay on your fast-moving bus or get off. You need to allow people who don’t share your vision and your values to move on to find theirs, and you need to “make room” for new people with new ideas, talents and skills. People who will support your vision and share your  values.

So how do you embrace turnover? How do you decide who stays on the bus and who goes? How do you know you are making the right decision?

1. Clear Vision/Values — First, get a strong sense of your vision and your values. You need to know where you’re headed, and then understand the moral compass of how you are going to get there. Your vision provides clarity on the end result, and your values help you decide how and with whom you need to make this journey.

2. Strong Communication — Share your vision and your values with anyone who will listen. And if they won’t listen, make them listen. Make it clear to employees joining your organization, to clients who buy your services, and to longtime employees during coaching sessions and at annual reviews. Make sure that everyone who aligns with your company understands who you are, what you are about and where you are headed.

3. Let Go — Lastly, have the courage to just let go, and the faith to believe that the right person will show up. Be honest with yourself, your team and your customers. If someone is not performing, ask yourself and ask them if they share the vision, if they embrace the values. Hold them accountable to act on their words.  If they don’t, then have the courage to let go. Allow them to move on to find the organization where they fit and where they can succeed. Then make room for the new person who will come on board ready, motivated and inspired to share your dream.

Yes, turnover is a good thing! Learn to embrace it and you will not only move your organization forward, you’ll become the leader who helps everyone achieve their dreams.